Degas at the National Gallery

On a recent visit to London I was lucky enough to stumble on a free exhibition of Edgar Dagas. It was a rare collection of some of his most distinct pastels in one room from collector Sir William Burrell. Of course on hearing this I jumped at the chance. For me Degas has always been an idol from childhood, encapsulated and drawn into his pastels … Continue reading Degas at the National Gallery

A Brief Look at Landscapes.

My main aim with this topic is to investigate the different styles and techniques artists throughout the ages used to depict the land around them, often giving a great insight into how they felt, and how they expressed their feelings for their surroundings through their art. I decided to look at, and compare styles between: Japanese style landscapes (1400-1600’s) Alexander Corzens (1717-1786) J. M. W … Continue reading A Brief Look at Landscapes.

Changing Views – a look at interiors and multi perspective

An interesting concept is the fact that even though we perceive and accept the object we see in front of us as recognisable things, a plant pot, your friend, a building etc, Β it’s usually only when you try and draw something in extreme perspective, close up, or from different angles, that you realise just how different the object looks. Sometimes even unrecognisable. There are a … Continue reading Changing Views – a look at interiors and multi perspective

Positive and Negative space.

Positive and negative space in art refers to the difference between the objects and the shadows that they cast by treating them as two separate entities. Positive being the actual objects themselves, and the negative referring to the space Β that is occupied or affected by the shadow. Treating them as two separate spaces immediately opens an invitation to manipulate the two planes to merge, separate … Continue reading Positive and Negative space.

Artist Critique: Debbie Smyth, Rosie James, Kumi Yamashita. Contours in cotton.

  Debbie Smyth. The one thing that struck me about Debbie Smyth was her original take on a rather old technique. Something that was often taught to school children which gradually fell out of favour, Smyth’s simplistic and playful use of this medium is taken to a whole new level with her black and white thread depictions of everyday street scenes and people. I feel … Continue reading Artist Critique: Debbie Smyth, Rosie James, Kumi Yamashita. Contours in cotton.

Artist Critique: Francis Alys, William Kentridge, Ellen Galagher, McAlpine Miller.

Fancis Alys. Part of a movement dealing with ‘interdisciplinary space of art, architecture, and social practice.’ A little apprehensive about the title, and at first glance, the content, I approached this with a little vigilance. A better description of his works and ideas would art addressing more than one discipline, including poetry, gesture, music, sound, duration performance, interactive media, video. Alys has a unique way … Continue reading Artist Critique: Francis Alys, William Kentridge, Ellen Galagher, McAlpine Miller.

Artist Critique – Odilon Redon.

The French symbolist painter from the mid 19th century, Odilon Redon extensively made use of light and tone to emphasis the mood and atmosphere of his paintings As in this self portrait the light is very hard, casting a shadow over the whole opposite side of his face. The painter hasn’t even brought out some highlights of the other eye giving the painting a rather … Continue reading Artist Critique – Odilon Redon.